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Bedeutung

 

 

Sedona anomalies


 

Moderne verschleiernde Begriffe und ihre tatsächliche Bedeutung

Verschleiernde Wortwahl – Übersetzung der wahren Bedeutung von Euphemismen
༺༻Euphemistischer BegriffWirkliche Bedeutung
1.AlternativlosDiktat
2.AnarchieStaatenloses System
3.AusweichverhaltenEigenständiges, selbstbestimmtes Leben
4.DemokratieKleptokratieherrschaft von Plünderern
5.EigenverantwortungSozialabbau
6.EntsorgungsparkEhemalige Müllkippe mit Rasen bedeckt
7.ExpertenNamenlose "Durchblicker"
8.Flexibilisierung des ArbeitsmarktsAbbau von Bürgerrechten
9.FreiheitWirtschaftsfreiheit
10.GeldPapierzettel, deren Wert andere bestimmen
Die Schuld einer Bank gegenüber einer Nicht-Bank/anderen Bank
11.GutmenschHumanist
12.IslamistRechtloser Mensch
13.KrawallBürgerprotest
14.LeistungsträgerAusbeuter und Profiteure
15.MilitäreinsatzKrieg
16.MinuswachstumRezession
17.Modernisierung des SozialstaatsSozialabbau
18.PolitikerPolitdarsteller
19.Systemrelevante BankenZocker, die das Geld der "Anleger" veruntreuen
20.UmbauAbbau
21.WettbewerbsfähigkeitLohndumping
22.WutbürgerMutbürger

Zitate zum Thema Bedeutung / Meaning and purpose

Zitate allgemein


 Feuerhimmel, 22. Dezember 2014
Abenddämmerungs-Reflexion des Lichts der
untergegangenen Sonne an Wolken, gebildet durch
Abkühlung feuchter Luftschichten
  • Der zeitliche Abstand […] lässt den wahren Sinn, der in einer Sache liegt, erst voll herauskommen. Die Ausschöpfung des wahren Sinnes aber, der in einem Text oder einer künstlerischen Schöpfung gelegen ist, kommt nicht irgendwo zum Abschluss, sondern ist in Wahrheit ein unendlicher Prozess. Hans-Georg Gadamer (1900-2002) deutscher Philosoph, Tübingen, Wahrheit und Methode, [Universale Hermeneutik], 1960, S. 282, Akademie Verlag GmbH, 2. Auflage 1. Oktober 2011


General quotes

Personal avowals

 

Recommendations

  • If you wish to see the truth then hold no opinions for or against anything.
    To set up what you like against what you dislike is the disease of the mind.
    When the deep meaning of things is not understood,
    the mind's essential peace is disturbed to no avail.
Attributed to Third Chinese Chán (Zen) Patriarch Jianzhi Sengcan (†606), poem Xinxin Ming

 

  • The purpose of life is to discover your gift.
    The work of life is to develop it.
    The meaning of life is to give your gift away.
    David S. Viscott (1938-1996) US American professor of psychiatry, pioneering radio talk show host, businessman, author, Finding Your Strength in Difficult Times. A Book of Meditations, 1993

 

Insights

  • The search for meaning is the search for expression of one's real self. James F. Masterson (1926-2010) prominent US American psychiatrist, source unknown

 

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Importance of meaning

  • Man cannot stand a meaningless life. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of depth psychology, author, R.F.C. Hull, editor, C.G. Jung Speaking. Interviews and Encounters, S. 438-439, Princeton University Press, December 1977, reprint edition 1. February 1987
  • The least of things with a meaning is worth more in life than the greatest of things without it. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of depth psychology, Modern Man in Search of a Soul, Harcourt Harvest, 4. August 1955, 1971

 

  • Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human. Viktor Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy

 

  • For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person's life at a given moment. Viktor Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy

 


Lilium kesselringianum
  • Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather he must recognize that it is he who is asked. Viktor Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy

 

  • Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for. Viktor Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy

 

  • People have enough to live by but nothing to live for: they have the means but no meaning. Viktor Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy, Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1975, republished 1997

 

  • Genuine religiousness must unfold in its own time. Never can anyone be forced to it. Viktor E. Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy, Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning, S. 72, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1975, republished 1997

 

  • (H)uman existence – at least as long as it has not been neurotically distorted – is always directed to something, or someone, other than itself – be it a meaning to fulfill or another human being to encounter lovingly. Viktor E. Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy, Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning, S. 78, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1975, republished 1997

 

1. Life has meaning under all circumstances.
2. Everyone has a will toward meaning.
3. Human beings have freedom of choice, over attitudes, even if over nothing else.
Viktor Frankl (1905-1997) Austrian psychiatrist, psychotherapist, neurologist, Nazi death camp survivor, meaning researcher, founder of logotherapy, Logotherapy in Action, S. 33, edited by Joseph Fabry, et. al., Inst Logotherapy Press, June 1979

 

  • The sole meaning of life is to serve humanity by contributing to the establishment of the kingdom of God, which can only be done by the recognition and profession of the truth by every man. Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) Russian playwright, essayist, novelist, writer, The Kingdom of God Is Within You, non-fiction philosophical treatise, chapter 12, published in Germany, 1894

 

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Original meaning of MYTH:

First meaning: "Emergent truth" ❄ Second meaning: "Falsehood"

  • Words have a range of meanings. […] The word 'myth' nowadays means false. […] One of the true meanings of the word 'myth' is emergent truth. The word that means truth has now come to mean false. Words can change that much. But words have a way of making comeback. […] At the end of an era fact and myth approach each other. Video presentation by Michael Meade Mosaicvoices.org US American storyteller, mythologist, ritualist, spokesman in the Men's Movement, author, Facebook entry, posted 5. April 2010, Mythic Nature of the Soul, YouTube film, minute 3:34, 6:42 minutes duration, posted 3. August 2011

 

  • The known misery doesn’t cause as much tension, because it is known.
    Unknown joy goes to the horizons and it causes turbulence. Minute 15:08
    You have to have joy with meaning, otherwise it becomes toxic. Minute 18:36
    Stress is not bad for you, if there is meaning in what you are doing. What makes you sick is being given responsibility without authority and a job without meaning. Minute 39:40
    Video interview with Mario Martinez, PsyD, Uruguaian clinical neuropsychologist, contemplative psychologist, psycho-neuroimmunologist, author, How Longevity Is Culturally Learned, presented by Conscious Evolution Media (CEM), YouTube film, 1:03:25 duration, posted 16. August 2016

 

 


Fractal art by Sebastian Baumer, 30. March 2008
  • The meaning of life is a conundrum we all have to figure out for ourselves. Someone else's meaning may make sense of their journey, but it is not necessarily right for you. Albert Camus suggested that life is meaningful precisely because it is absurd. I believe he meant that if someone figures out a meaning, and, however sincerely, tries to impose it on you, then it is likely wrong for you. In other words, there is no common packaged meaning, as many would profess. Your life becomes meaningful when you keep this question before you, as both guide, and a prompting to move out of yesterday's answer. Today's meaning will need be replaced by tomorrow's when you have better questions, more comparative experience, and an enhanced capacity for ambiguity and mystery. And all provisional meanings must meet the test of honest skepticism, and be confirmed by your inner, autonomous knowing, not the consensual voice of a clamorous group around you. Something inside of us knows what is right for us, and we have to humbly learn to track its voice and align its wisdom with our outer choices. James Hollis, Ph.D. (*1940) US American licensed Jungian psychoanalyst, professor of Jungian Studies, Saybrook University, author, James Hollis: The meaning of life is a conundrum..., presented by Excellence Reporter, Nicolae Tanase, 17. April 2015

 

  • Question: How do we know when we are truly happy in a society that has conditioned us to be entertained, to be occupied, to be self-content.
    Answer by JN: It's a queer, interesting question. […]
    Man, humanity, human being is not exactly born for what we ordinarily call happiness. I would say the fundamental motivation for a human being, really, is meaning. Meaning, to have a meaningful life. That doesn’t neccessarily require lots of pleasures and happiness. It can be very difficult, it can be very hard, it can be full of sorrow, but it may be so meaningful that it brings happiness in a very different sense. You wouldn’t trade a life full of great meaning for a life of just pleasure. Insofar as happiness is a kind of pleasure one can never be satisfied with that, it’s like a drug. Pleasure is not meaning. Pleasure can be meaningful, but pain can be also meaningful. When you’re in that kind of a situation and you're living a life of meaning then I think you know what happiness really is. I hope that’s not to paradoxical sounding. Introspective discussion on spirituality and wisdom with Jacob Needleman, Ph.D. jacobneedleman.com (*1934) US American professor of philosophy and religion, UCSF, author, Necessary Wisdom, presented by Commonwealth Club, Personal Growth Forum, California, host Stephanie Kriebel, board certified health coach, educator, chair, YouTube film, minute 21:13, 57:00 minutes duration, posted 18. November 2014

 

  • The good life is not about looking good, feeling good, or having the goods. It's about being good and doing good. Significance in life doesn't come from status, sex, salary. It comes from serving. It is In giving our lives away we find meaning, we find significance.   Video presentation by Father Rick Warren (*1954) US American evangelical Christian minister, Saddleback Church, Lake Forest, California, philanthropist, bestseller author, Living a life of purpose, presented by TED Talks, 2006, YouTube film, minute 11:22, 21:48 minutes duration, posted 15. April 2008

 

  • Increasing entropy isn't incompatible with increasing complexity, but it can seem that way because of how we sometimes translate the technical terms into informal speech. We say that entropy is "disorderliness" or "randomness," and that it always increases in isolated systems (such as the universe). If the general tendency of stuff is to grow more random and disorganized, it might seem strange that highly organized subsystems come into being without any guiding force [Eros] working behind the scenes. Sean Carroll, US American theoretical physicist, California Institute of Technology, cosmologist, author, The Big Picture. On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself, S. 227, Dutton, 10. May 2016

 

  • There's a huge amount of evidence that above a certain relatively modest level, more money doesn't create all that much more satisfaction and happiness in one's life, and that what ultimately confers satisfaction and happiness are non-monetary things:
    ➤ satisfying work,
    ➤ close relationships,
    ➤ living a life of meaning.
I think that as more people are liberated from the struggle for survival, you're going to have more people who have the luxury of seeking meaning, seeking a sense of purpose, a sense of transcendence.
Look at the work of the Nobel-prize economist Robert William Fogel, talking about "the fourth great awakening." He talks about how the quest for self-realization has expanded from a tight fraction of the planet to much more of it, especially in the developed world. Others call it "meaning-want" — parts of the planet have gone from "material-want" to "meaning-want."
Ronald Inglehart of the University of Michigan calls it a move from materialist values to post-materialist values. I think there's a certain luxury that comes from being materially well off that liberates people to seek something more. Interview with Daniel Pink danpink.com (*1964) US American motivational speaker, chief speech writer of US vice president Al Gore (1995-1997), visionary author, The Changing Workplace, presented by US American eJournal, February 2006, reprinted by IIP Digital usembassy 3. June 2008

 

  • The quest for certainty blocks the search for meaning. Uncertainty is the very condition to impel man to unfold his powers. Erich Fromm (1900-1980) German US American social psychologist, psychoanalyst, humanistic philosopher, author, Man for Himself. An Inquiry into the Psychology of Ethics, chapter 3, 1947

 

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Pursuit of happiness ⇔ ensuing happiness

  • The Bushmen in the Kalahari Desert talk about the two "hungers". There is the Great Hunger and there is the Little Hunger.
    ⚑ The Little Hunger wants food for the belly;
    ⚑ but the Great Hunger, the greatest hunger of all, is the hunger for meaning [...].
There is ultimately only one thing that makes human beings deeply and profoundly bitter, and that is to have thrust upon them a life without meaning.
There is nothing wrong in searching for happiness. But of far more comfort to the soul is something greater than happiness or unhappiness, and that is meaning. Because meaning transfigures all. Once what you are doing has for you meaning, it is irrelevant whether you're happy or unhappy. You are content – you are not alone in your Spirit – you belong. Laurens van der Post (1906-1996) South African farmer, war hero, political advisor to British heads of government, friend of Prince Charles, godfather of Prince William, cultural anthropologist, conservationist, humanitarian, philosopher, educator, filmmaker, journalist, 20th-century Afrikaner author, VHS documentary film Hasten Slowly. The Journey of Sir Laurens van der Post, produced and directed by Mickey Lemle, Lemle Pictures, Inc., New York City, New York, Vimeo film trailer, 62 minutes duration, 1. January 1996, posted 14. July 2014

 

 

  • Research has shown that having purpose and meaning in life increases overall well-being and life satisfaction, improves mental and physical health, enhances resiliency, enhances self-esteem, and decreases the chances of depression. On top of that, the single-minded pursuit of happiness is ironically leaving people less happy, according to recent research. "It is the very pursuit of happiness," Frankl knew, "that thwarts happiness."
    "Happy people get a lot of joy from receiving benefits from others while people leading meaningful lives get a lot of joy from giving to others," explained Kathleen Vohs, one of the authors of the study, in a recent presentation at the University of Pennsylvania. In other words, meaning transcends the self while happiness is all about giving the self what it wants. People who have high meaning in their lives are more likely to help others in need. "If anything, pure happiness is linked to not helping others in need," the researchers, which include Stanford University's Jennifer Aaker and Emily Garbinsky, write.1 Article A Psychiatrist Who Survived The Holocaust Explains Why Meaningfulness Matters More Than Happiness, presented by German-owned American business, celebrity and technology news website Business Insider, Emily Esfahani Smith, Swiss-Canadian instructor in positive psychology, University of Pennsylvania, editor, journalist, writer, reissued by the US American magazine The Atlantic, 22. October 2014

 

  • Having more meaning in one's life was associated with activities like buying presents for others, taking care of kids, and arguing. People whose lives have high levels of meaning often actively seek meaning out even when they know it will come at the expense of happiness. Because they have invested themselves in something bigger than themselves, they also worry more and have higher levels of stress and anxiety in their lives than happy people. […] Meaning, on the other hand, is enduring. It connects the past to the present to the future. Article A Psychiatrist Who Survived The Holocaust Explains Why Meaningfulness Matters More Than Happiness, presented by German-owned American business, celebrity and technology news website Business Insider, Emily Esfahani Smith, Swiss-Canadian instructor in positive psychology, University of Pennsylvania, editor, journalist, writer, reissued by the US American magazine The Atlantic, 22. October 2014

 

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Four pillars of meaning:

Belonging ☯ Purpose ☯
Storytelling ☯ Transcendence

  • Belonging: We all need to find our tribe and forge relationships in which we feel understood, recognized, and valued to know we matter to others.
    Purpose: We all need a far-reaching goal that motivates us, serves as the organizing principle of our lives, and drives us to make a contribution to the world.
    Storytelling: We are all storytellers, taking our disparate experiences and assembling them into a coherent narrative that allows us to make sense of ourselves and the world.
    Transcendence: During a transcendent or mystical experience, we feel we have risen above the everyday world and are connected to something vast and meaningful.
    Emily Esfahani Smith, Swiss-Canadian instructor in positive psychology, University of Pennsylvania, editor, journalist, writer, The Power of Meaning. Crafting a Life That Matters, Crown, 10. January 2017

 

  • Each year, forty thousand Americans take their lives, and worldwide, that number is closer to a million.  S. 22
    Belonging: It is particularly distressing to be unhappy in a country where so many others are happy.  S. 23
    We all need to feel that we belong […]  S. 49
    Purpose: A purpose-driven person is ultimately concerned […] with making the world a better place.  S. 90
    Storytelling: Our storytelling impulse emerges from a deep-seated need all humans share: the need to make sense of the world.  S. 104
    Transcendence: First, our sense of self washes away along with all, its petty concerns and desires. We then feel deeply connected to other people and everything else that exists in the world.  S. 133
    The idea that we can grow to lead deeper and more meaningful lives through adversity.  S. 162
    All across the country [...] people are using the pillars as a means to transform the institution in which we live and work, creating communities that value and build connections, celebrate purpose, provide opportunities for storytelling and leave space for mystery.  Chapter "Cultures of Meaning", S. 192
    Contemplating death can actually help us, if we have the proper mindset, to lead more meaningful lives and to be at peace when our final moment on earth arrives.   S. 217
    Emily Esfahani Smith, Swiss-Canadian instructor in positive psychology, University of Pennsylvania, editor, journalist, writer, The Power of Meaning. Crafting a Life That Matters, Crown, 10. January 2017

 

  • All things are subject to interpretation whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) German classical scholar, critic of culture, philologist, philosopher of nihilism, author, Maudemarie Clark, editor, Brian Leite, editor, Daybreak. Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality, Cambridge University Press, pocket book, 13. November 1997

 

  • The meaning of life is to give life meaning. Ken Hudgins, US American author, source unknown

Humor

  • Just when I discovered the meaning of life, they changed it. George Carlin (1937-2008) controversial US American stand-up comedian, social critic, actor, author, source unknown

Quotes by David Hawkins

⚠ Caveat See Power vs. Truth, January 2013

  • On examination, we'll see that power arises from meaning. It has to do with motive, and it has to do with principle. Power is always associated with that which supports the significance of life itself.
    - It [power] appeals to that part of human nature that we call NOBLE – in contrast to force, which appeals to that we call CRASS.
    - Power appeals to what uplifts, dignifies, and ennobles. Force must always be justified, whereas power requires no justification.
    - Force is associated with the partial, power with the whole.
Dr. David R. Hawkins, Power vs. Force. The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior, chapter 8 The Source of Power, S. 132, Hay House, February 2002

 

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Meaning, value, and validity rely on perception.

 

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Context determines motive and value.

  • Meaning is defined by context, which determines motive. It is the motive that establishes spiritual value. To dedicate one's actions as a service of love to life is to sanctify then and transform them from self-seeking motives to unselfish gifts. We define excellence as dedication to the highest standards. Every act can then be held as an opportunity to glorify God by sheer purity of endeavor. All physical tasks and labor can be ingredients in one's contribution to the world. Even the smallest task can be seen as serving the common good, and if viewed in that light, work becomes ennobled. Dr. David R. Hawkins, The Eye of the I From Which Nothing is Hidden, chapter 5, S. 106, 2001

 

 

  • What anything ‘means’ is identical with what it is, for what it is, is its meaning. With this realization, the essence of the world shines forth with the Radiance of Divinity as revelation, and all is seen to be equally lov­able, perfect, magnificent, and beautiful. Dr. David R. Hawkins, Reality, Spirituality and Modern Man, S. 308-309, 2003

 

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Various reactions to events

  • It is not the events of life but how we hold them in mind that creates our reaction. Events in and of themselves have no power to affect how we feel, one way or another. What does affect us is our position and judgment about them, and how we decide to be with them. Our attitude, our point of view, the context, and the overall meaning give the event the emotional power over us give the event the emotional power over us. We can see that we are the creator of the meaning and impact it has on us. Dr. David R. Hawkins, Healing and Recovery, chapter 4 "Health", S. 129, 2009

 

  • Meaning is defined by context, which determines motive, and it is the motive that establishes spiritual value. To dedicate one's actions as a service of love to life is to sanctify them and transform them from self-seeking motives to unselfish gifts. We define excellence as dedication to the highest standards. Every act can then be held as an opportunity to glorify God by sheer purity of endeavor. All physical tasks and labor can be ingredients in one's contribution to the world. Even the smallest task can be seen as serving the common good and, if viewed in that light, work becomes ennobled. Dr. David R. Hawkins, Along the Path to Enlightenment. 365 Reflections from David R. Hawkins, edited by Scott Jeffrey, S. ?, Reflection of September 30th, January 2011

 

  • Context is what creates meaning, significance. All of human life is lived from the nonlinear domain. Although we handle an object in the linear it's the nonlinear that gives us significance. It gives it meaning. Human life then is lived subjectively as the experiential presence of consciousness itself as it registers the linear domain. Video presentation by Dr. David R. Hawkins, On Spirituality, excerpted from Seminar Title unknown, date unknown, YouTube film, minute 4:02+, 7:42 minutes duration, posted 1. September 2011

 

 

 

Links zum Bedeutung / Meaning and purpose

Literatur

Literature (engl.)

Externe Weblinks


External web links (engl.)


Audio- und Videolinks

Audio and video links (engl.)

The success of his book The Purpose-Driven Life triggered Warren's own crisis of purpose, grappling with stewardship of influence and the stewardship of affluence.


Linkless media offering

  • Video interview with Father Rick Warren, pastor, Saddleback Church, What is life?, presented by Big Think, 4:41 minutes duration, posted 4. February 2008

Three levels of life: Survival ◊ success ◊ significance

 

Interne Links

Hawkins

 

 

1 Article Stanford research: The meaningful life is a road worth traveling, presented by Stanford Report, Clifton B. Parker, 1. January 2014

Letzte Bearbeitung:
23.08.2017 um 14:36 Uhr

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