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Unbewusstes – Unterbewusstsein

 

 

Sigmund Freuds Therapiecouch
Freud-Museum, London, Großbritannien


 

Zitate zum Thema Unbewusstes / Unconscious

Zitate allgemein

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Auf der Schwelle zur Individuation und mutigen Integrität

  • Der erste Schritt zur Individualität ist die Ablösung des Einzelwesens von der Ununterschiedenheit und Unbewusstheit der Herde. Es ist die Vereinsamung des reifen Menschen, der nicht mehr von den Werturteilen seiner Umwelt abhängt, sondern in seiner Beziehung zum Selbst fest verankert ist. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Schweizer Psychiater, Psychoanalytiker, Gründer einer Schule der analytischen Tiefenpsychologie, Autor, Quelle unbekannt

 

  • Das Unbewusste ist das eigentlich reale Psychische, uns nach seiner inneren Natur so unbekannt wie das Reale der Außenwelt und uns durch die Daten des Bewusstseins ebenso unvollständig gegeben wie die Außenwelt durch die Angaben unserer Sinnesorgane. Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) österreichischer Neurologe, Tiefenpsychologe, Begründer der Psychoanalyse, Religionskritiker, Autor, Gesammelte Werke. Die Traumdeutung / Über den Traum Band 2/3, S. 617, S. Fischer, 9. Auflage 1. Januar 1945

 

  • Man kann vieles unbewusst wissen, indem man es nur fühlt, aber nicht weiß. Fjodor Michailowitsch Dostojewski (1821-1881) russischer Romanschriftsteller, Quelle unbekannt

 

  • Ein Zehntel wird bewusst, neun Zehntel wirken unbewusst. Lawrence S. Kubie, M.D. (1896-1973) US-amerikanischer Psychoanalytiker, Neurotische Deformationen des schöpferischen Prozesses, Rowohlt, Nr. 244, bes. S. 32, 1966

General quotes

Personal avowals

 

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Passion daemon

  • A creative person has little power over his own life. He is not free. He is captive and driven by his daemon. Perhaps I might say: I need people to a higher degree than others, and at the same time much less. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, autobiography Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Fontana Press, 1961, reissued edition 6. March 1995

 

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Szent-Györgyi's description of his creative process is remarkably like that given by French mathematician Jacques Hadamard (1865-1963) in his classic The Psychology of Invention in the Mathematical Field.

  • Scientific creation is in many ways germane to artistic creation [...]. In order to solve a problem, I have to think very hard about a problem but this thinking never leads me anywhere; it is but a necessary priming process. Finding myself unable to solve my problem, I 'drop it', that is, let it sink into my subconscious. How long it stays there varies. Then, unexpectedly, the solution is passed into my conscious mind. My brain must have done as the Hungarian laxative which was advertised: "While you sleep it does the work." Albert Szent-Györgyi (1893-1986) Hungarian physiologist, Nobel Peace Prize laureate in physiology or medicine, 1937, article On Scientific and Artistic Creativity, presented by peer-reviewed academic journal Leonardo published by the MIT Press, Volume 6, Number 1, S. 57-58, Winter 1973

 

Conclusion

  • Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, source unknown

 

Future outlook / Appeal

  • This is a historic time, a time when the gods in the unconscious are transforming. We are living in a time that the Greeks called the "Kairos" – the right moment – for a "metamorphosis of the gods," that is, a transformation in and of the collective unconscious itself. The peculiarity of our time, which is certainly not of our conscious choosing, is that the timeless unconscious within us is transforming itself in unprecedented, dramatic ways. […]
    As a species we are experiencing an undeniable uprising of the dark, destructive forces of the collective unconscious. As thinking, reflective, conscious human beings, we can no longer deny the dark stirrings of the unconscious as it plays itself out ever more conspicuously on the world stage. These overwhelming psychic forces are active powers that cannot be fitted into our rational world order, explained away by our reason, nor argued out of existence. If we are not in denial, it is obvious that the powers of the underworld, as if they have a severe "control process," are attempting to centralize power and global control over our entire species in a way that is devoid of any pretense of democratic legitimacy, compassion, or redeeming charm whatsoever.
    We are being confronted with the naked darkness of the soul, and asked, make that demanded, to come to terms with and face up to this darkness. The dark side of our nature, or we could even say the shadow of God, is revealing Itself and incarnating through the unconscious of humanity. In these apocalyptic times we live in, the dark God, the "deus absconditus" – which is an essential element of the psychological self – is incarnating. This hidden God is paradoxically present in its apparent absence. Something is being revealed to us in the process. The times in which we are living are truly initiatory. Paul Levy (*1956) US American psycho-activating healer, artist, author, Dispelling Wetiko. Breaking the Curse of Evil, North Atlantic Books, 15. January 2013
  • The unconscious is the only available source of religious experience. This is certainly not to say that what we call the unconscious is identical with God or is set up in his place. It is simply the medium from which religious experience seems to flow. As to what the further cause of such experience might be, the answer to this lies beyond the range of human knowledge. Knowledge of God is a transcendental problem. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, Civilization in Transition – Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 10, S. 565, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 2nd edition 1. August 1970

 

  • Empirical psychology loved, until recently, to explain the "unconscious" as mere absence of consciousness – the term itself indicates as much – just as shadow is an absence of light. Today accurate observation of unconscious processes has recognized, with all other ages before us, that the unconscious possesses a creative autonomy such as a mere shadow could never be endowed with. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, R. F. C. Hull, translator, Psychology and Religion. West and East – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 11, S. 14, 1938, Princeton University Press, 2nd edition January 1975

 

 

 


Retiform bark of a sweet chestnut
  • In the unconscious is everything that has been rejected by consciousness, and the more Christian one's consciousness is, the more heathenishly does the unconscious behave, if in the rejected heathenism there are values which are important for life. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, R. F. C. Hull, translator, Psychology and Religion. West and East – The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 11, essay Answer to Job, S. 713, 1952, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1938, 2nd edition January 1975

 

  • Anyone who penetrates into the unconscious with purely biological assumptions will become stuck in the instinctual sphere and be unable to advance beyond it, for he will be pulled back again and again into physical existence. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, R. F. C. Hull, translator, Psychology and Religion. West and East – The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 11, subheading The Tibetan Book of the Dead. Psychological commentary, S. 843, Princeton University Press, 1935, 2nd edition January 1975

 

 

 

  • A man who is unconscious of himself acts in a blind, instinctive way and is in addition fooled by all the illusions that arise when he sees everything that he is not conscious of in himself coming to meet him from outside as projections upon his neighbour. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, R.F.C. Hull (translator), Alchemical Studies – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 13, essay "The Philosophical Tree", paragraph 335, S. 265, 1945, 1967, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1983

 

  • A man who is unconscious of himself acts in a blind, instinctive way, and is, in addition, fooled by all the illusions that arise when he sees everything that he is not conscious of in himself coming to meet him from outside as projections upon his neighbour. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of depth psychology, author, R.F.C. Hull (translator), Alchemical Studies – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 13, essay The Philosophical Tree, paragraph 335, S. 610, 1945, 1967, S. 265, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1983

 

  • Filling the conscious mind with ideal conceptions is a characteristic of Western theosophy, but not the confrontation with the Shadow and the world of darkness. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious. The latter procedure, however, is disagreeable and therefore not popular. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, R.F.C. Hull (translator), Alchemical Studies – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 13, essay The Philosophical Tree, paragraph 335, S. 265, 1945, 1967, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 1983

 


Two child sisters
  • Any attempt to determine the nature of the unconscious state runs up against the same difficulties as atomic physics: the very act of observation alters the object observed. Consequently, there is at present no way of objectively determining the real nature of the unconscious. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, edited by Gerhard Adler, translated R. F. C. Hull, Mysterium Coniunctionis – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 14, S. 88, 1955, Princeton University Press, New Jersey, 2nd edition 1. August 1977

 

  • As we all know science began with the stars, and mankind discovered in them the dominants of the unconscious, the "gods," as well as the curious psychological qualities of the Zodiac: a complete projected theory of human character. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, source unknown

 

  • [If the unconscious is] […] properly dealt with in one place only, it is influenced as a whole, i.e., simultaneously and everywhere. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, Letters, Vol. 2. 1951-1961, S. 595, Princeton University Press, 1. April 1976

 

 

  • Greater than all physical dangers are the tremendous effects of delusional ideas […]. The world powers that rule over humanity, for good or ill, are unconscious psychic factors, and it is they that bring unconsciousness into being […]. We are steeped in a world that was created by our own psyche. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, Michael Fordham, editor, The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 8, centerpiece On the Nature of the Psyche, paragraph 747, Princeton University Press, 1. January 1970

 

  • The collective unconscious […] appears to consist of mythological images […]. In fact, the whole of mythology could be taken as a sort of projection of the collective unconscious.
    We can see this clearly if we look at the heavenly constellations, whose originally chaotic form were organised through the projection of images […]. These influences are unconscious introspective perceptions of the activity of the collective unconscious. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, Michael Fordham, editor, The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 8, centerpiece On the Nature of the Psyche, par. ?, S. 325 (S. 152), Princeton University Press, 1. January 1970

 


Child, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother
  • One cannot resist it. It gets you below the belt and not in your mind, your brain just counts for nothing, your sympathetic system is gripped. It is a power that fascinates people from within, it is the collective unconscious which is activated, it is an archetype which is common to them all that has come to life. And because it is an archetype, it has historical aspects and we cannot understand the events without knowing history. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, source unknown

 

  • The conscious mind allows itself to be trained like a parrot, but the unconscious does not – which is why St. Augustine thanked God for not making him responsible for his dreams. The unconscious is an autonomous psychic entity; any efforts to drill it are only apparently successful, and moreover harmful to consciousness. It is and remains beyond the reach of subjective arbitrary control, a realm where nature and her secrets can be neither improved upon nor perverted, where we can listen but may not meddle. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, Psychology and Alchemy – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 12, 1944, S. 51, Routledge, London, 2nd edition 1968

 

  • We know that the mask of the unconscious is not rigid – it reflects the face we turn towards it. Hostility lends it a threatening aspect, friendliness softens its features. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, Psychology and Alchemy – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 12, S. 29, 1944, Routledge, London, 2nd edition 1968

 

  • The unconscious is not a demoniacal monster, but a natural entity which, as far as moral sense, aesthetic taste, and intellectual judgment go, is completely neutral. It only becomes dangerous when our conscious attitude to it is hopelessly wrong. To the degree that we repress it, its danger increases. Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) Swiss psychiatrist, psychoanalytist, founder of a new school of analytical depth psychology, author, The Practical Use of Dream Analysis – Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Volume 16, 1934, S. 329, Bollingen Foundation Inc., Pantheon Books Inc., New York, N.Y., 1954

 

  • What in Jungian terms we call the collective unconscious and what in physics we call matter were, in alchemy, always one: the psyche. Dr. Marie-Louise von Franz (1915-1998) Swiss Jungian psychologist and scholar, author, Alchemical Active Imagination, Spring Publications, Dallas, 1979, Shambhala, revised paperback edition 2. December 1997

 

  • [T]he mystery of the structure of the universe, was in themselves, in their own bodies and in that part of the personality which we call the unconscious, but they would say in the life of their own material existence. [...] They thought that instead of taking outer materials you could just as well look inside and get information directly from that mystery because you were it. After all, you too were a part of the mystery of cosmic existence, so you could just as well watch it directly.
    Even further, you could ask matter, the mystery of which you consist, to tell you what it is, to reveal itself to you.  Instead of treating it like a dead object to be thrown into a vessel and then cooked in order to see what came out, you could just as well take a block of iron, for instance, and ask it what it was, what its kind of life was, what it was doing, how it felt when melted. But since all these materials are within you, you can also contact them directly and in that way they contacted what we would now call the collective unconscious, which to them was also projected into the inner aspect of their own bodies.
    They consulted these powers directly through what they called meditation and therefore most of these introverted alchemists always stressed the fact that one should not only experiment outwardly but should always insert phases of introversion with prayer and meditation and a kind of yoga. With yoga meditation you try to get the right hypothesis, or information, about what you are doing or about the materials. Or you can, for instance, talk to quicksilver, or to iron, and if you talk to quicksilver and iron then naturally the unconscious fills up the gap by a personification. Then Mercury appears to you and tells you who the sun God is. A power, the soul of Gold, appears and tells you who and what it is. Dr. Marie-Louise von Franz (1915-1998) Swiss Jungian psychologist and scholar, author, Alchemical Active Imagination, Spring Publications, Dallas, 1979, Shambhala, revised paperback edition 2. December 1997

 

  • Whenever a person turns sincerely to his unconscious psyche and its knowledge (not, however, when he dwells on subjective thoughts and feelings) by considering its objective expressions, such as dreams and spontaneous fantasies, sooner or later the image of the Self will appear and confer upon the ego the potential for a renewal of its life. Dr. Marie-Louise von Franz (1915-1998) Swiss Jungian psychologist, scholar, author, Archetypal Dimensions of the Psyche, Shambhala, 1997, new edition 16. February 1999

 

  • The scapegoat mechanism is probably the single most universal and successful inner dynamic on this earth. It cannot work, of course, unless you are totally unconscious. Unfortunately, a high percentage of people are unconscious, and spend much of their life in denial, avoidance, reaction formation or projection. We are largely unwilling to bear the dark/impure side of anything. We would rather pretend to be "light-bearers", and as this passage reveals, end up like Lucifer. Father Richard Rohr O.F.M. (*1943) US American Franciscan friar, Cheap Religion is Worse Than No Religion, presented by Malespirituality.org, January 2004

 

  • The underworld became this fiery place that we must never go to when actually the underworld is the only place we [women] should go to. Audio interview with Christine Page, M.D., British physician, "wisdom keeper", president of the International Society for the Study of Subtle Energy and Energy Medicine, speaker, author, Illness As A Message From The Soul, presented by the US American web radio station New Dimensions, host Justine Willis-Toms, minute 44:34, 57:00 minutes duration, posted 8. January 2014

 

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Freud did not discover the unconscious.

  • One of the virtually reactionary myths of the twentieth century is that Sigmund Freud is the "discoverer of the unconscious." The legend of Freud not only falsifies historical truth but also burdens the history of enlightenment with an absurd and inexplicable asymmetry and retardation in the investigation of the unconscious. How could enlightenment have investigated consciousness critically and empirically without encountering its "other side"? […] Enlightenment depth psychology was born in 1784, […] when the Marquis of Puységur discovered so-called magnetic sleep, which came to be called hypnosis in the nineteenth century. [...]
    Hypnosis […] had a grave disadvantage, for which reason, later enlightenment tried to repress this more than a century old "episode": After the procedure, the patients had forgotten everything they had experienced. Through the "posthypnotic amnesia," as it was later called, they were at the mercy of the magnetizer, who could profit from their excursions into the unconscious. Still in a trance, they had to submit themselves to the healing commands of the magnetizer, who transposed the knowledge he had gained in the session about the patient's problematic into hypnotic instructions. These were supposed to remain effective in the unconscious for the patient's own good. Understandably, later enlightenment did not want to be involved with such procedures based entirely on authority and trust. After all, psychologically speaking, enlightenment always meant an advance in the training of mistrust – in the construction of an ego concerned about self-assertion and control of reality. Freud's methodology can be summarized, in a way, as the attempt to keep the path to the unconscious open without using hypnosis. One may consider whether, in Freud's procedure, a finesse born of mistrust is not at work. Peter Sloterdijk (*1947) German cultural scientist, professor of philosophy, Universität Karlsruhe, TV host, essayist, Critique of Cynical Reason, two volumes, [1983] S. 47-49, University of Minnesota Press, 1987, 1989

 


Shwezigon-Pagode, Bagan, Myanmar
  • Research has shown that in the first few milliseconds of our perceiving something we do not only unconsciously comprehend what it is, but decide whether we like it or not; the cognitive unconscious presents our awareness with not just the identity of what we see, but an opinion about it. Our emotions have a mind of their own, one which can hold views quite independently of our rational mind?. Daniel Goleman (*1946) US American psychologist, science journalist, author, Emotional Intelligence. Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, Bantam, 1st edition 2. June 1997

 

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The soul's sensitivity does not depend on the human mind.

  • It is a great source of error to believe that there is no perception in the soul besides those of which it is conscious. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) German polylingual philosopher, physicist, mathematician, historian, politician, diplomat, source unknown

 

 

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Ayn Rand refers only to men's written history of scarcity within patriarchy that comprises merely 5% of human metahistory.

  • Man is free to choose not to be conscious, but not free to escape the penalty of unconsciousness: destruction. Man is the only living species that has the power to act as his own destroyer – and that is the way he has acted through most of his history. Ayn Rand (1905-1982) Russian-American philosopher, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, The Virtue of Selfishness, "The Objectivist Ethics", based on interviews with Alvin Toffler (1928-2016) US American futurist, focused on digital revolution, communication revolution, corporate revolution and technological singularity, writer, 1962

Quotes by David R. Hawkins

⚠ Caveat See Power vs. Truth, January 2013

  • One must remember that love and peace are the greatest threats to the 'ego' which defends itself by resorting to entrenched positionalities that lie hidden in the unconscious. These non-loving attitudes have arisen from the still present biologic, survival-oriented animal brain which surfaces in childhood where parental and societal pressures force them to go underground by the well-known psychological ego mechanisms of repression, denial, suppression, reaction formation, projection, and rationalization. Dr. David R. Hawkins, I. Reality and Subjectivity, chapter 19, S. 325, 2003

 

 

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Archetypal judgement mechanism

  • In Egyptian mythology, the soul goes to Hades [Duat], where the Lord of the Underworld (Osiris) sits in judgment and weighs the sinner's heart on the scales, whose destiny then hangs in the balance. To understand this depiction (which operates quite mightily in the human psyche) we first note that it is referring to the 'underworld'. This is the judge in the unconscious mind that is self-judging and hands out sentences of guilt, suffering, and self-hatred. This myth is an accurate depiction of the dark side of the unconscious. Dr. David R. Hawkins, I. Reality and Subjectivity, ~S. 331, 2003

 

  • Wickedness knows that within the unconscious of everyone is the unsuspecting innocence of the child. Interview with Dr. David R. Hawkins, Healing and Recovery, presented by US American health magazine Unified Health!, Matt Laughlin, Vol. 5, issue 14, pg. 21, winter 2009 Link deleted

Englische Texte – English section on the Unconscious

Shadow imprints


Cartoon von Servio Aragonés
Blog von Grafiker Adan Avelar Islas, MAD, 1979
The shadow is...

° a part of the unconscious
[repressed weaknesses, shortcomings, instincts]
° a reservoir for human darkness
° instinctive
° irrational
° archetypal
° personal and collective
° consists of several layers
° the seat of creativity
° independent of the conscious mind
° prone to personal projection1
° prone to collective projection2
° personifies all what one refuses to acknowledge about oneself
° represents a tight passage (a narrow door)
° characterized by Darth Vader (Luke Sykwalker's downside), Cinderella,
°° the Frog Prince, the monstrous Minotaur, werewolves.

Entrainment of unconscious men via the 'Man Box'

The Man Box is mentality drummed into virtually all boys and men while being socialized into a male dominated culture.
Locked into unconscious brain circuits it led many men to disrespect, mistreat and abuse women and each other.
Breaking free from the commands of the Man Box
Creating a gentle world for both men and women
DosDon'ts
Be a protector.◊ Don't cry openly or openly express emotions – with the exception of anger.
Show outer strength.◊ Do not show weakness or fear.
Show outer courage.◊ Do not ever ask for help.
Show aggression (anger).◊ Do not be like a woman (sissy).
Act tough.◊ Do not be like a gay man.
Be athletic. 
Make decisions on your own. 
Exercise control over ... 
Demonstrate dominance – especially over women. 
View women as property. 
Treat women as objects. 
Be heterosexual. 
Source: ► Video interview with Tony Porter, US American educator and activist to end violence against women, A call to men,
presented by TED Talks, 11:14 minutes duration, filmed and posted December 2010, YouTube film, posted 10. December 2010
See also: ► Männerliteratur – Men's literature and ► Männer – Men

 

US American educator and activist to end violence against women Tony Porter shares how he was socialized into the Man Box, how he had suffered in it, how he had pressed it onto to his 5-year-old son, how he had succumbed to the man box call pretending to sexually abuse a 16 year old mentally ill girl to be accepted as a "real" man in the gang, how ashamed he was about not being able to speak the truth and to act honorably, to act as a gentle man. After he grasped the tragedy of a world in violence and abuse – he is promoting a gentle world for both men and women. Tony Porter makes a call to men everywhere:

 

            Don't "act like a man." Break free of the "man box."            

 

Links zum Thema Unbewusstes / Unconscious

Literatur

Literature (engl.)

Foreword: "My search to understand evil and its transformation is what attracted me to Paul Levy’s invaluable work. […] In helping us understand and face the lies that weave through our lives, Paul Levy’s work leads us to our extraordinary opportunity. […] It is a rare philosopher and spiritual leader who can help us to look into the mirror of our collective participation and denial. Yet, Paul Levy accomplishes this and more. He helps us find a way to explore the most intimate connections between our spiritual and material lives and the wider psychic storm and power lines in which we struggle. He makes a way through our madness, our "spiritual starvation," to invoke our imagination to literally "change our mind."  […] As you read Dispelling Wetiko, you will be challenged. You will savor moments of "ah ha." When you have finished, you will find that something has shifted. There are fewer spiritual calluses between your imagination and your daily life. You will see a way forward that you had not seen before. You will feel less isolated, more hopeful. You will never quite look at the world in exactly the same way again."  Foreword by Catherine Austin Fitts, US American former assistant secretary of housing under George H.W. Bush, managing a 300 billion dollar portfolio, whistleblower on financial terrorism, president of Solari.com

Externe Weblinks

  • Wikipedia-Einträge Johari-Fenster 1) Arena (dem Ich und anderen bewusst) 2) Blinder Fleck (den anderen bewusst, dem Ich nicht bewusst) 3) Fassade (dem Ich bewusst, den anderen nicht bewusst) 4) Nicht bekannt (dem Ich und anderen nicht bewusst), Kollektives Unbewusstes

External web links (engl.)

  • Wikipedia entries Collective unconscious, Johari window 1) Arena (known to self and others) 2) Blind spot (known to others, not known to self) 3) Facade (known to self, not known to others) 4) Unknown (not known to others and self),

Audio- und Videolinks

  • Video TV Präsentation von George Pennington, britisch-deutscher Psychologe, Trainer, Coach, Autor, Das Unbewusste – Kreative Möglichkeiten, Teil 4/13 der Sendereihe Bewusst leben. Psychologie für den Alltag, präsentiert von TV-Sender BR alpha, gesendet 2005 und 2013, YouTube Film, 14:03 Minuten Dauer, eingestellt 22. Januar 2011
  • Video TV Präsentation von George Pennington, britisch-deutscher Psychologe, Trainer, Coach, Autor, Das Unbewusste – Altlasten, Teil 5/13 der Sendereihe Bewusst leben. Psychologie für den Alltag, präsentiert von TV-Sender BR alpha, gesendet 2005 und 3. März 2013, YouTube Film, 14:36 Minuten Dauer, eingestellt 22. Januar 2011

Audio and video links (engl.)

Moret conducts research concerning the impact on the health of the environment and global public health from atmospheric testing, nuclear power plants, and depleted uranium.

 

Interne Links

Englisch Wiki

Hawkins

 

 

1 Turning a personal inferiority into a perceived moral deficiency in a fellow human; rankism, 'us vs. them' syndrome, racism, persecution of 'non-believers'

2 Rankism, 'us vs. them' syndrome, racism, persecution of 'non-believers'

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